Sign up with your email address

DOCUMENTARY REVEALS THE UNSEEN SIDE OF THE LEGEND ANDRE THE GIANT

Posted on 0

Documentary Reveals The Unseen Side Of The Legend Andre The Giant

Jason Hehir’s HBO documentary called ‘Andre the Giant’ premiered last Tuesday and it unveiled a completely different side of the legend. André René Roussimoff (1946-1993) was known to the world as André the Giant, a French-born international wrestling superstar, actor, and unofficially carried the title of “the greatest drunk on Earth”. However, the documentary reveals that he drank because he was in pain as Roussimoff denied treatment for fear that it would change his body on which he built his entire career on. André weighed 520 lb and was 7 ft 4 in tall and suffered from acromegaly, or “giantism”.

Documentary Reveals The Unseen Side Of The Legend Andre The Giant

Documentary Reveals The Unseen Side Of The Legend Andre The Giant

Documentary Reveals The Unseen Side Of The Legend Andre The Giant

Documentary Reveals The Unseen Side Of The Legend Andre The Giant

Documentary Reveals The Unseen Side Of The Legend Andre The Giant

Documentary Reveals The Unseen Side Of The Legend Andre The Giant

Documentary Reveals The Unseen Side Of The Legend Andre The Giant

Documentary Reveals The Unseen Side Of The Legend Andre The Giant

Documentary Reveals The Unseen Side Of The Legend Andre The Giant


Via

share

MOTEL VOYEUR: THE PERVERSE STORY OF THE VOYEUR GERALD FOOS

Posted on 0

The American writer Gay Talese, among the fathers of New Journalism, would have told the story of Gearld Foos without checking the sources well. His remains a key text to understand the passion of a sick mind. In bookstores from 19 January 2018.

Motel Voyeur: The Perverse Story Of The Voyeur Gerald Foos

 

Among the books that inaugurate the literary 2017 stands out Motel Voyeur and not only because the author is Gay Talese, among the fathers of New Journalism along with iconic writers such as Tom Wolfe, Norman Mailer and Truman Capote. To tickle the curiosity of the former signature of the New York Times is the story of Gerald Foos, the manager of a motel in Aurora, Colorado, who in the sixties gave free rein to his voyeuristic tendencies secretly spying on his guests.

 

Motel Voyeur: The Perverse Story Of The Voyeur Gerald Foos

 

After having pinned their sexual habits for years, in 1980 Foos contacted Talese so that his diary could be included in the novel La donna d’altri, an extraordinary investigation of the eroticism of overseas that the famous writer would soon publish. Only thirty years later, when Foos agreed to renounce his anonymity, Talese convinced himself to return to the subject.

 

Motel Voyeur: The Perverse Story Of The Voyeur Gerald Foos

 

“Society has taught us to lie, steal, cheat, and deception is the most important requirement among the qualities of a man,” he discusses as if this consideration did not concern him. Who knows what book would have come out if Talese had treated him with more cynicism. On the contrary, this wise narrator of 84 years does not betray the principles of the literature of the realities of which he was the leading exponent, giving back dignity even to “a hidden spy in the attic who claimed to be morally superior while examining and judging his guests with harshness and , at the same time, he arrogated the right to stick his nose with detachment and in total impunity “.

 

Motel Voyeur: The Perverse Story Of The Voyeur Gerald Foos

 

Last year, a few days after the publication of the book in the USA, Paul Farhi of the Washington Post raised doubts about Talese’s ethical conduct and then about the veracity of the story. The complaint has troubled not a little Talese who first said he wanted to stop the promotional tour, then he retraced his steps, making changes to the text that took into account the inaccuracies reported. The book comes out on January 19th in the revised version.

 

Motel Voyeur: The Perverse Story Of The Voyeur Gerald Foos

Via Wired

share

TRUMPSTEIN OR THE MODERN PROMETHEUS

Posted on 0

Trumpstein or the modern prometheus

Like Frankenstein‘s rejection of his creation is the fact that Shelley does not give it a name, which causes a lack of identity. Instead it is referred to by words such as “wretch”, “monster”, “creature”, “demon”, “devil”, “fiend”, and “it”. When Frankenstein converses with the creature in Chapter 10, he addresses it as “vile insect”, “abhorred monster”, “fiend”, “wretched devil”, and “abhorred devil”.

share

WIMBLEDON OUT LOUD

Posted on 0

To mark the tennis calendar’s biggest event, London-based motion graphics producer Alexander Purcell has created a digital art piece that pays homage to the sport’s top women, whose gutteral cries have become a celebrated part of the game. The digital mash-up features the vocal chords of Maria Sharpova (who has been clocked at 100 decibels) and Yung-Jan Chan, the audio sourced from their third-round match in this year’s French Open and complemented by visuals from 1970s video game Pong. Since Monica Seles’s 1992 Wimbledon loss to Steffi Graff, during which the referee ordered Seles to “turn it down,” speculation has been rife that a grunt-powered racket makes all the difference. Brunel University professor Alison McConnell recently put the theory to the test: “There’s some evidence to suggest that the vocalisation is part of a breathing strategy that adds stability to the trunk thereby optimising power production during the racquet stroke,” she says, adding that for female players, the technique could be a game-maker. “Women’s upper bodies tend to be weaker, so there may be a greater benefit to them in using this particular strategy,” she concludes. A match point, then, for the ladies who pump up the volume.

Via ( Nowness )

share