Sign up with your email address

THE MOST INCREDIBLE TRUE STORY

Posted on 0

Three twins separated at birth that grow miles away from each other, in different environments and families, without knowing anything about each other. Then, life makes one discover and find another and the two together find the third. In the United States, the true story of the three twins that fate brought together finds space in all the newspapers, the three now men become famous, make appearances in movies and open restaurants.

What better thing to adapt for a film that could be a breath of fresh air, a source of good feelings for those who leave the cinema after seeing it? And in fact it is these days in American theaters Three Identical Strangers, a documentary directed by Tim Wardle that tells the extraordinary meeting of the three, but unfortunately also the dramatic evolution of their history, with the result that the film becomes more than anything else a cue of reflection on human nature and leaves a sense of bitterness rather than well-being.

Made through the stories of the protagonists, witnesses of this incredible story and repertoire images, Wardle’s documentary begins to tell the story from 1980, when Robert Shafran, nineteen, enrolled at Sullivan County Community College, in New York State . As often happens to many students on the first day of university, the sense of insecurity and embarrassment prevails over the ailment, so Robert would like to be noticed as little as possible, go unnoticed. And yet, the exact opposite happens to him: everyone smiles, says hello, asks him how he is. But they call him Eddy, because it’s Eddy Galland who swapped him, a student who had been in that College until recently.

It will be Michael Domitz, Robert’s roommate, to explain the misunderstanding to the newcomer: same curly and black hair, same mouth, same smile. Even the same physicist, Robert and Eddy are both tall and broad-shouldered. When Robert then learns that Eddy’s birthday is July 12, 1961, he realizes that it’s not just a matter of coincidences, Eddy is his twin brother. The two were separated at birth and their cases were then managed by the agency Louise Wise Services.

But now fate has made them rediscover and their, so far, beautiful story is told by all the newspapers and local television networks. This is how a Queens lady discovers that the twins are not two, but three and the third is her adopted son David. The three, gathered, are celebrated by half the United States, appear on the covers of magazines, are photographed by Annie Leibovitz and participate, for a cameo, also in Cercasi Susan desperately, the film with Madonna and Rosanna Arquette. In New York their restaurant, Triplets becomes a trendy place.

Why, however, no one, not even the adoptive parents, had been told the truth? Lawrence Wright is the New Yorker journalist, Pulitzer Prize, who will help the twins back in time and discover that they are the three survivors of a quadrigemellar birth. Wright tells this part of the story, which is the dramatic part, in the documentary Three Identical Strangers: the newborns were the guinea pigs of the psychiatric experiments Peter Neubauer and Viola Bernard, whose goals were to understand in this way how individuals with the same genes they would be behaving in different environments.

Robert, Eddy and David were then entrusted to three families of different social classes, with the complicity of the adoption agency, Louise Wise Services, which, however, now reported, claims to have never learned anything about the experiments.

Eddy took his own life in 1995, he suffered from depression, but many argue that having discovered that he had been the guinea pig of an experiment throughout his life led him to take this tragic decision. Dr. Neubauer died in 2008. Not being able to ask questions, for his documentary Wardle, Natasha Josefowitz, the former assistant, now in her ninety years old, intervenes in the psychiatrist who has followed him in all his experiments. The woman tries to convince director and audience that what we have become in life, what we have done, has depended on our genes.

It is with the intention of proving this that psychiatrists have separated the twins, making them grow into different realities and going to find them (like other separated twins) each year to test them. It is the opposite theory to that according to which almost everything we are depends on the nature and environment in which we live. Tim Wardle gives space to both theses without supporting either of them.

share

THE DEVIL AND DANIEL JOHNSTON

Posted on 0

The devil and Daniel Johnston

The Devil and Daniel Johnston is a stunning portrait of a musical genius that nearly slipped away. It depicts a perfect example of brilliance and madness going hand in hand. Because Daniel Johnston is an artist suffering from manic depression with delusions of grandeur, wild fluctuations, numerous downward spirals, and periodic respites mark his life. The film artfully melds current footage, vintage performances, home movies, and dozens of recorded audiotapes from Johnston’s life. Testimony from supportive friends and a deeply committed family adds a rich layer to Johnston’s personal history, but Daniel Johnston’s poetic songs tell their own passionate, haunting, and truly unforgettable story. The film was directed by Jeff Feuerzeig and produced by Henry S. Rosenthal.

The devil and Daniel Johnston

The devil and Daniel Johnston

The devil and Daniel Johnston

The devil and Daniel Johnston

The devil and Daniel Johnston

The devil and Daniel Johnston

The devil and Daniel Johnston

The devil and Daniel Johnston

The devil and Daniel Johnston

The devil and Daniel Johnston

The devil and Daniel Johnston

The devil and Daniel Johnston

The devil and Daniel Johnston

The devil and Daniel Johnston

The devil and Daniel Johnston

The devil and Daniel Johnston

The devil and Daniel Johnston

The devil and Daniel Johnston

share

DOCUMENTARY REVEALS THE UNSEEN SIDE OF THE LEGEND ANDRE THE GIANT

Posted on 0

Documentary Reveals The Unseen Side Of The Legend Andre The Giant

Jason Hehir’s HBO documentary called ‘Andre the Giant’ premiered last Tuesday and it unveiled a completely different side of the legend. André René Roussimoff (1946-1993) was known to the world as André the Giant, a French-born international wrestling superstar, actor, and unofficially carried the title of “the greatest drunk on Earth”. However, the documentary reveals that he drank because he was in pain as Roussimoff denied treatment for fear that it would change his body on which he built his entire career on. André weighed 520 lb and was 7 ft 4 in tall and suffered from acromegaly, or “giantism”.

Documentary Reveals The Unseen Side Of The Legend Andre The Giant

Documentary Reveals The Unseen Side Of The Legend Andre The Giant

Documentary Reveals The Unseen Side Of The Legend Andre The Giant

Documentary Reveals The Unseen Side Of The Legend Andre The Giant

Documentary Reveals The Unseen Side Of The Legend Andre The Giant

Documentary Reveals The Unseen Side Of The Legend Andre The Giant

Documentary Reveals The Unseen Side Of The Legend Andre The Giant

Documentary Reveals The Unseen Side Of The Legend Andre The Giant

Documentary Reveals The Unseen Side Of The Legend Andre The Giant


Via

share

MOTEL VOYEUR: THE PERVERSE STORY OF THE VOYEUR GERALD FOOS

Posted on 0

The American writer Gay Talese, among the fathers of New Journalism, would have told the story of Gearld Foos without checking the sources well. His remains a key text to understand the passion of a sick mind. In bookstores from 19 January 2018.

Motel Voyeur: The Perverse Story Of The Voyeur Gerald Foos

 

Among the books that inaugurate the literary 2017 stands out Motel Voyeur and not only because the author is Gay Talese, among the fathers of New Journalism along with iconic writers such as Tom Wolfe, Norman Mailer and Truman Capote. To tickle the curiosity of the former signature of the New York Times is the story of Gerald Foos, the manager of a motel in Aurora, Colorado, who in the sixties gave free rein to his voyeuristic tendencies secretly spying on his guests.

 

Motel Voyeur: The Perverse Story Of The Voyeur Gerald Foos

 

After having pinned their sexual habits for years, in 1980 Foos contacted Talese so that his diary could be included in the novel La donna d’altri, an extraordinary investigation of the eroticism of overseas that the famous writer would soon publish. Only thirty years later, when Foos agreed to renounce his anonymity, Talese convinced himself to return to the subject.

 

Motel Voyeur: The Perverse Story Of The Voyeur Gerald Foos

 

“Society has taught us to lie, steal, cheat, and deception is the most important requirement among the qualities of a man,” he discusses as if this consideration did not concern him. Who knows what book would have come out if Talese had treated him with more cynicism. On the contrary, this wise narrator of 84 years does not betray the principles of the literature of the realities of which he was the leading exponent, giving back dignity even to “a hidden spy in the attic who claimed to be morally superior while examining and judging his guests with harshness and , at the same time, he arrogated the right to stick his nose with detachment and in total impunity “.

 

Motel Voyeur: The Perverse Story Of The Voyeur Gerald Foos

 

Last year, a few days after the publication of the book in the USA, Paul Farhi of the Washington Post raised doubts about Talese’s ethical conduct and then about the veracity of the story. The complaint has troubled not a little Talese who first said he wanted to stop the promotional tour, then he retraced his steps, making changes to the text that took into account the inaccuracies reported. The book comes out on January 19th in the revised version.

 

Motel Voyeur: The Perverse Story Of The Voyeur Gerald Foos

Via Wired

share

TRUMPSTEIN OR THE MODERN PROMETHEUS

Posted on 0

Trumpstein or the modern prometheus

Like Frankenstein‘s rejection of his creation is the fact that Shelley does not give it a name, which causes a lack of identity. Instead it is referred to by words such as “wretch”, “monster”, “creature”, “demon”, “devil”, “fiend”, and “it”. When Frankenstein converses with the creature in Chapter 10, he addresses it as “vile insect”, “abhorred monster”, “fiend”, “wretched devil”, and “abhorred devil”.

share